More in common than we ever knew – the music performance degree and the PhD

 

There are a lot of similarities between dancing and wrestling. The costumes are the same, the spandex and all that, but you have to be light on your feet to do both, and you have to reme
A completely unverified quote that illustrates this post nicely!

 

As a PhD student, there are a lot of parallels to the music student experience. Most obviously, both are student circumstances and both take on a master-apprentice style framework, and both require a great deal of effort and work. But that work is often much less structured than a taught university degree.

For my PhD I am expected to maintain a certain level of continuing development, which takes the shape of CPD courses, methodology intensives, and conference attendance and to tailor this continuing development to my own needs. And in addition to this plan, I must keep on top of my own schedule of reading, writing, data collecting, analysing, and synthesising. There is no syllabus to tell me what should happen each week or benchmarks to help me ensure I’m on track. Guidance and help are available if I want to seek it out, but it’s entirely feasible to operate for quite a while and not know you’ve run off track because the experience is so highly individualised that no two experiences are the same.

The supervisory relationship, as with all other aspects of the PhD, is entirely individual and dependent on personalities, teaching and learning style, and discipline. I am lucky enough to have a positive working relationship with my supervisors wherein I am allowed the freedom to define my research and conduct the data collection and fieldwork with guidance but not interference and offer benchmarks when necessary in order to help me stay on track.

And while I have had a largely positive experience, you don’t have to look very hard to find students with overbearing supervisors, holding collected data hostage, dictating publishing aims, or exhibit any of a variety of negative behaviours. I realise how lucky I have been in my academic journey.

This framework is not dissimilar to the music student, something that has become increasingly apparent to me as I have been interviewing people in the conservatoire setting.

As a conservatoire student, you are paired with a private study tutor that ideally supports you and helps you to master the technical skills necessary to become a successful performer and provides the mentorship necessary to become competent in the professional community and your relationship is largely based on personalities, teaching and learning style, and discipline. Some people need a strict and obvious definition of the student-teacher relationship and others thrive in more relaxed conditions wherein they can tell their teacher what is going on in their life.

In the conservatoire, I’ve come across people who need the ability, to be frank with their tutor and say “I’m a bit hungover this morning because my girlfriend broke up with me” and likewise know their tutor will be frank with them and say “yes, that was a bit shit, but let’s draw a line under it and get back to work” while offering more emotional support and others need to a certain distance from their tutor and would be very uncomfortable discussing social or personal lives with their tutor.

With this in mind, the large question I’ve come to is how to ensure that students – in both settings – have access to the well-being resources they need? When the course of study is so highly individualised and based on the personalities and characteristics of individual people, how do you regulate the experience? How do you ensure that the first student receives the pastoral care that they need while ensuring you don’t alienate the second student? Not only is it a matter of identifying the needs of the student body but additionally, it’s a matter of identifying who needs them and deploying those resources.

 

(If you were hoping for an answer, I apologise because I have not yet figured it out!)

-Danielle

P.S. To read more about life in the conservatoire, from the perspective of the conservatoire, you can visit this website

P.P.S If you are considering a doctorate, have questions, or are just interested in learning more visit here – or send me a message!

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